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Definition
  
  

​Consecutive Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters, typically mid-August to early-August. Financial Aid reporting and awards are based on academic year.

A
  

​A student who has been enrolled in the last 3 years. Please see definition of continuing student for cross-reference.

A
  

​A standard by which something can be measured, benchmarking is used to compare peer institutions to improve results. After identifying the key metrics and indicators for benchmarking purposes (e.g., completion rates for part-time students), the peer or comparison group must be identified (regional, state, and/or national).  (See Peer Institution for additional information).

KCC’s Office of Institutional Research (OIR) then gathers and analyzes data from three primary sources: through Complete College America (CCA), IPEDS, and the National Community College Benchmark Project (NCCBP).  The analyzed data is reported across the College (through scorecards, KCC Institutional Research website, etc.).  OIR then provides recommendations for sustaining or changing practices affecting current outcomes, and these recommendations are used to inform decision-making at both departmental and institutional levels. 

B
  

​While the chief executive officer (KCC President) continues to be the primary contact point between the Higher Learning Commission and KCC, the ALO is the second line of communication about Commission policies, practices, and other matters related to accreditation. Appointed by the CEO of the educational institution, the ALO is responsible for:

  1. Serving as a primary recipient of Commission communications regarding the institution’s accreditation, in addition to the chief executive officer.
  2. Disseminating information and answers questions about Commission policies and procedures for all audiences within the institution.
  3. Staying current with Commission policies and procedures.
  4. Providing oversight and direction for the institution’s Data Update Coordinator (at KCC, this is the IPEDS keyholder) to ensure the currency, accuracy, and timeliness of information submitted to the Commission as part of the Annual Institutional Data Update (AIDU).
  5. Providing oversight and direction for the timely submission of substantive change requests and reports required by Commission policy.
  6. Facilitating responses to Commission inquiries, including complaints referred by the Commission staff to the CEO.
  7. Maintaining the institution’s file of official documents and reports related to the institution’s relationship with the Commission. Such files are often kept in the president’s office.
  8. Providing comments to the Commission as requested in its consideration of proposed policies, procedures, and issues affecting the accreditation relationship.
  9. Ensuring that any changes in basic institutional information are reported to the Commission.
  10. Ensuring that the institution meets its financial obligations to the Commission through the timely payment of dues and fees.
A
  

Colleges and universities voluntarily seek accreditation from non-governmental bodies to ensure that the education provided by them meets acceptable levels of quality. There are two types of educational accreditation: institutional and specialized. ​

A
  

​The Academic Quality Improvement Program, or AQIP, is one avenue for a college to maintain accreditation with the Higher Learning Commission, and is what KCC has chosen institutionally. It is based on continuous improvement and relies on several indicators of quality. 

A
  

​AQIP-accredited institutions must undergo a Systems Appraisal every four years. This is an opportunity for an institution to get expert, objective, third-party feedback on its strengths and opportunities for improvement. In turn, institutions gain insight in determining the next targets for advancing quality in the institution through Action Projects and other plans.

A
  

KCC's Systems Portfolio is an active document that specifies the systems that KCC has put in place to ensure that our mission is successful.  It is part of the AQIP continuous improvement process, and is reviewed by HLC to ensure the evidence we provide continues to meet their criteria for accreditation. ​

A
  

​AQIP accreditation cycle is a pathway of eight years.  The current, 2015 AQIP transition map shows the activities that involve HLC and KCC.

A
  

Indicates that one event is the result of the occurrence of the other event, i.e., there is a causal relationship between the two events. This is also referred to as cause and effect.​

The use of a controlled study is the most common way of establishing evidence of causality between variables, but it is important to note that you cannot prove causation with any experimental design: You can only have weaker or stronger evidence of causality. Causal relationships are established by experimental design, not a particular statistical test. You could use a correlation as your statistical test and demonstrate that the true experiment you conducted showed causation.

In a controlled study, the sample or population is divided in two, with both groups being comparable in almost every way. The two groups receive different treatments, and the outcomes of each group are assessed. If the two groups have noticeably different outcomes, the different experiences may have caused the different outcomes. There are limits to the use of controlled studies; for example, it would not be appropriate to use two comparable groups and have one undergo a harmful activity while the other does not.

To overcome this situation, observational studies are often used to investigate correlation and causation for the population of interest. The studies can look at the groups' behaviors and outcomes and observe any changes over time. In any study, but especially in an observational study, evidence for causality is increased by including relevant covariates, giving a scientifically plausible causal path, replicating results and so on. However, even in the best experimental design, you don't prove causality.

C
  

​Official enrollment figures measured by the number of enrolled students on the 10th class day after the start of a term.

C
  

A six-digit code assigned to a content area by the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Each program of study has a Classification of Instruction Programs (or CIP) code; and each course has a CIP code that is assigned in the curriculum committee process.  The codes are used for tracking enrollment and completion rates at the federal and state level.  ​

C
  

​A group of people, established for data tracking purposes, who share a common characteristic or experience within a defined time period. In institutional research, cohorts usually consist of full-time, first-year students who begin college in a given fall.

C
  

​KCC administers the Community College Survey of Student Engagement, or CCSSE exam every three years, which provides information on student engagement.  The survey, administered to community college students, asks questions that assess institutional practices and student behaviors that are correlated highly with student learning and student retention.

C
  

​Competitive intelligence, or CI, is the action of defining, gathering, analyzing, and distributing intelligence about products, customers, competitors, and any aspect of the environment needed to support leadership and others making strategic decisions for an organization.

There is a process involved in gathering information, converting it into intelligence and then utilizing this in decision-making. CI essentially means understanding and learning what's happening externally, so the organization can be as prepared and empowered to anticipate and face challenges head on.

C
  

​Complete College America, or CCA, is a national nonprofit that works with states to significantly increase the number of Americans with quality career certificates or college degrees and to close attainment gaps for traditionally underrepresented populations.  Over half of the states nationwide participate, providing comprehensive progress and student success data on two and four year colleges.

C
  

​A student in the current term who was enrolled during the previous term. In the case of the fall term, “previous term” may mean either the previous summer or spring term.

C
  

A statistical measure, expressed as a number, which describes the size and direction of a relationship between two or more variables. A correlation between variables does not automatically mean that the change in one variable is the cause of the change in the values of the other variable.​

How Correlation is measured
For two variables, a statistical correlation is measured by the use of a Correlation Coefficient, represented by the symbol (r), which is a number that describes the degree of relationship between two variables.  The coefficient's numerical value ranges from +1.0 to –1.0, which provides an indication of the strength and direction of the relationship.

If the correlation coefficient:

  • Has a negative value (below 0), it indicates a negative relationship between the variables, meaning the variables move in opposite directions, i.e., when one increases the other decreases, or when one decreases the other increases.
  • Has a positive value (above 0), it indicates a positive relationship between the variables, meaning both variables move in tandem, i.e. as one variable decreases the other also decreases, or when one variable increases the other also increases.
  • Is 0, this indicates there is no relationship between the variables (one variable can remain constant while the other increases or decreases).
C
  
  • ​Successful Completion– An earned grade of A, B, C, or S (Satisfactory)
  • Non-Successful Completion – D, F, I (Incomplete), W (Withdrawal), WF (Withdrawal, Failing), WX (Institution Withdrawal/Non-Attendance), or U (Unsatisfactory)

 

C
  

A unit of measure representing the equivalent of 50 minutes of instruction per week over the entire term.  It is applied toward the number of credit hours needed for completing the requirements of a degree, certificate, diploma, or other formal award.​

C
  

​A course used to meet the requirements of a degree or certificate granted by KCC.

C
  

The collection and use of evidence to monitor and improve student learning.

A
  

For collecting most institutional data about students, KCC utilizes the Colleague student information system and the reporting module Informer.

D
  

Courses that are below entry-level, credit-bearing college course levels.  Developmental courses are designed to prepare students for college-level work, and are also known as remedial education. ICCB and Complete College America track placement in progress from developmental education and beyond in two subjects: math and English.

KCC tracks placement for math, English, and reading. Students may apply their financial aid towards these courses, although completion of these courses often does not fulfill graduation requirements.   

D
  

Education that uses one or more technologies to deliver instruction to students who are separated from the instructor and to support regular and substantive interaction between the students and the instructor synchronously and asynchronously. 

Technologies used for instruction may include the following: Internet, one-way and two-way transmissions through open broadcasts, closed circuit, cable, microwave, broadband lines, fiber optics, satellite or wireless communication devices, audio conferencing, and video cassette, DVDs, and CD-ROMs if the cassette, DVDs, and CD-ROMs are used in a course in conjunction with the technologies listed above.​

D
  

An acceleration means through which high school students may simultaneously earn credit toward high school completion and a college degree. Dual credit students may attend courses at their high school, or on the KCC campus.

 

D
  

Similar to Dual Credit where the high school student earns college credit but does not earn credit towards high school completion. ​​

D
  

Registration for coursework and payment of fees constitutes official enrollment.

E
  

​Neither parent completed a Bachelor’s (4-year college) degree or higher. Even if a students’ parent earned their Associate’s degree, they are still considered the first in their family to go to college. Likewise, if the students’ parents attended a 4-year college, but did not graduate, they are considered first generation. The same applies even if the students’ sibling(s) attended and graduated from a 4-year college(s).

F
  
A student who has no prior postsecondary experience attending any institution for the first time at the undergraduate level, and is enrolled for the first time at KCC in a term.  This includes students who entered with advanced standing (college credits earned before graduation from high school).  For first-time students in the fall term, this includes students who attended KCC  for the first time in the prior summer term.
F
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