General Copyright Guidelines

Suggested references for those wanting to learn more about copyright at KCC

  • KCC Copyright Policy
  • Fair Use  
  • Copyright Quiz
  • Copyright Lessons on YouTube - The four YouTube clips replace the previous PowerPoint and Copyright CD.  If you cannot view all four clips below, the CD is available for checkout from the KCC Library.  Transcripts of the clips are also available on the CD.
    • The Basics of Copyright for the General Public
    • Copyright in Real Life - examples 1 and 2
    • Copyright in Real Life - examples 3, 4 and 5
    • Wrap-up and Sources/Resources

Did you know?

  • You can violate copyright even if you don't sell the copies you have made.
  • Your own work is protected by copyright even if you don't give copyright notification and register your work with the Library of Congress.

Copyright law protects the rights of the individual who creates the original work. In addition, the law provides reasonable access to the work. This access comes through particular limitations on copyright, including the principles of fair use.

Fair use means that students or employees:

  • can make one copy of a printed work for personal study,
  • can quote and paraphrase someone else's work in your own writing as long as you give credit to the original author and also as long as your quotations are brief (State University of New York at Oswego, 2002).

Here are a few tips to keep in mind with regards to copyright

  • Individuals are solely responsible and liable for their personal web pages and e-mails utilizing college servers.
  • Unauthorized use of text, images, or coding from web sites, computer programs and e-mails infringes on the rights of the copyright owner.
  • Employees can e-mail materials (e.g., a copyrighted article) to yourself (but not others) for educational purposes.
  • Copyright begins the moment the ideas are expressed as keystrokes.
  • The right to make a derivative work is the right of the copyright holder. Permission should be sought before taking and manipulating graphics, artwork, or text from web sites for use in one's own works.
  • If one is the copyright holder or the electronic work is in the public domain, there is no problem with manipulating or copying the work. Public Domain is the status of a work not protected by copyright (University of North Carolina, 2003a & 2003b).

References

State University of New York at Oswego (2002). Copyright and Student Work. Retrieved May 26, 2003, from section 9.2 of http://www.oswego.edu/library/tutorial/shared.html  (Update: April 15, 2011 - This web page no longer exists.)
University of North Carolina (2003a). Copyright and Students. Retrieved December 3, 2003, from http://www.lib.unc.edu/instruct/copyright/student/ (Update:  January 26, 2012 - this web page no longer exists.)
University of North Carolina (2003b). Copyright and the Web. Retrieved December 3, 2003, from http://www.lib.unc.edu/instruct/copyright/digital/web.html (Update: January 26, 2012 - this web page no longer exists.)